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administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominated massachusetts senator john kerry to replace hilary clinton as secretary of state. the former presidential candidate who lost to george w. bush in 2004 got the nod after u.n. ambassador susan rice withdrew her name. she'd faced republican criticisms over the benghazi terrorist attack. president obama made the announcement this afternoon at the white house. >> i am very proud to announce my choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him for this role. having served with valor in vietnam, he understands that we have a responsibility to use american power wisely, especially our military power. and he knows, from personal experience, that when we send our troops into harm's way, we must give them the sound strategy, a clear mission, and the resources that they need to get the job done. in an extraordinarily distinguished senate career and as chairman of the foreign relations committee, john has played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly
individuals know as many presidents and prime ministers or grasp our foreign policies as firmly as john kerry. this makes him a perfect choice to guide american diplomacy in the years ahead. >> big news for the senior senator from massachusetts. tonight, kerry biographer professor douglas brinkley on the president's nominee for secretary of state. >>> bad news for red lobster and olive garden after they come out against obama care. we'll tell you how people are voting with their dollars. >>> and you won't see the real victims of the real war on christmas on the kirby couch. >> what do you make of the political correctness part of our culture? >> john nichols of "the nation" magazine on people who stand to suffer the most when we go over the fiscal cliff. you can prevent gas with beano meltaways, or treat gas with these after you get it. now that's like sunblock before or sun burn cream later. oh, somebody out there's saying, now i get it! take beano before and there'll be no gas. take beano before progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're t
a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll nominate? caller: obama. host: what makes him your hero? caller: we were on a major slide when he came
individuals, ministers grasp our foreign policies as firmly as john kerry. this makes him a perfect choice to guide american diplomacy in the years ahead. >> big news for the senior senator from massachusetts. tonight, kerry biographer professor douglas brinkley on the president's nominee for secretary of state. >>> bad news for red lobster and olive garden after they come out against obama care. we'll tell you how people are voting with their dollars. >>> and you won't see the real victims of the real war on christmas on the kirby couch. >> what do you make of the political correctness part of our culture? >> john nichols of "the nation" magazine on people who stand to suffer the most when we go over the fiscal cliff. the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or vis
, is a frequent guest on "morning joe" to discuss foreign policies and world affairs. but this spring she came to us with her own memoir. "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war from 1937 to 1948." in it, she tells of prague in one of its darkest chapters, the breakout of world war ii, when at just 2 years old, she was forced to flee czechoslovakia with her family. hearse is an immigrant story like so many others, including my mother's and fathers. whose birthday, my father's, will never forget. you've got a really good memory. she's the author of the new memoir of "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war from 1937 to 1948." this book is amazing. >> and speaking of the brzezinskis, you know, it's amazing how much dr. brzezinski's life was shaped by the fact that they fled warsaw right before the uprising and mrs. brzezinski, of course, had to flee czechoslovakia, just like you. and you actually talked about in a debate that rose up about colin powell and his view of the world, polilus -- versus your v of the world, how your view was shaped by your childhood. >> t
foreign policies as firmly as john kerry. this makes him a perfect choice to guide american diplomacy in the years ahead. >> big news for the senior senator from massachusetts. tonight, kerry biographer professor douglas brinkley on the president's nominee for secretary of state. >>> bad news for red lobster and olive garden after they come out against obama care. we'll tell you how people are voting with their dollars. >>> and you won't see the real victims of the real war on christmas on the kirby couch. >> what do you make of the political correctness part of our culture? >> john nichols of "the nation" magazine on people who stand to suffer the most when we go over the fiscal cliff. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." thanks for watching tonight. president obama mad
the truth for a change instead of trying to get some political advantage. >> a look at war and foreign policy in 2012. >> this time of war began in afghanistan, and this is where it will end. >> afghanistan is now the nation's longest war. more than two dozen americans had died in fighting it. in 2012, the president promised that the end was in sight. what did our brave young men or women in uniform achieve in afghanistan in the year 2012? >> we lost a lot. we lost a lot. we can say it is a result of the president's there -- dare that they did find a some of the modern, but they are paying a terrible price. >> was the idea to go into afghanistan to get rid of al qaeda? and now they are fighting the taliban? how long does this go on? what is the rationale? >> i think the rationale disappeared years ago. i think obama had an opportunity when he came into office to make a decision, and he went for a replay of the surge in iraq, which succeeded in iraq, but he did not give -- i'm not sure weather it would have had any chance, but he supplied a number of troops much lower than with the comm
. for some time now, overseas resources have been cut or withheld, and important foreign policy objectives have been starved. consider that last year we spent approximately $650 billion on our military. by contrast, the international affairs budget is less than one-tenth of the pentagon's. secretary gates has spoken about this and strongly urged the congress to address that imbalance. we have not yet. admiral mullen pointed out, the more diplomacy is cut, the more lives are lost. we have to make certain that we are not penny-wise and pound- foolish when it comes to supporting america's vital overseas interests. adequately funding foreign- policy initiatives is not spending, but investing in our long-term security, and more often or not, it saves far more expensive expenditures in dollars and lives in the conflicts that we fail to see or avoid. we need to invest in america's long-term interest in order to do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world. this report makes that crystal clear. since 1985, i have had the privilege of making official journeys to one trouble spot or another. i have
these jobs. foreign policy is my passion yet actually i'm also a mother. i want to be at home for the last five years that my children are at home. it was hard for me to admit that to myself. in the end i had to recognize, both as a matter of need and want, that my life was going to go in a different direction than i had always expected it would. i had to listen to that. i had to, in the end say, wow, maybe i'm not the same person i thought i was. i know this is the right thing for me to do. >> what was the most difficult part of your job in relation to balancing it with your role as a mother? >> it was just that sense so often where particularly my oldest son really needed me home, needed us both there. and i was in another place. i could not do anything about that. you know, i think that is true for millions of parents. certainly millions of women. i realize the stress was just overwhelming of knowing i had a child who really did need me and i couldn't respond. i couldn't live up to that responsibility. >> after you came to your decision you must have talked to secretary clinton. she's a
of john kerry, what does u.s. foreign policy gain and lose with kerry at the helm here. as we both know, secretary clinton had broad name recognition and on the flip side, some say john kerry comes with far more experience than when secretary clinton took up the job. >> well, obviously, this is, i believe, one of the most qualified individuals in the country and ever to be nominated secretary of state. these are his assets and one, he's participated the last 30 years in the major foreign policy debates in the country so deep knowledge. secondly, he's a combat veteran and a war hero so he knows the scourges of war and military involvement and thirdly, he's a man of the congress and one of the big problems in the state department is that they don't get funded for embassy security and consulate security like in benghazi. kerry can bring his enormous prestige as a senator for many years to get that funding. he's almost become president and foreign leaders respect him and the most important element, richard is his relationship with the president. it's a strong one. he's carried out a lot of
the preoccupation of the committee and a preoccupation of the foreign policy and those concerned with foreign policy nationwide. why now? partly because this time we lost an ambassador and a great man. but mostly, it's because now benghazi isn't just a loss of diplomats, we have lost some before, but now there is a partisan advantage to be sought by one side or the other . this incident was an important, but is it more important than the north korean nuclear program? is it more important than the other subjects that haven't been the subject of so many hearings of this committee? we have now decided to focus on the politics security in part because we can blame one party or the other. we can blame the state department for not allocating its resources to diplomatic security or blame the republican congress for not appropriating the enough. we should do more for diplomatic security. this department should follow its own procedures, and we have not done so. we would like to believe in the world that is subject somehow to our control, that if we just do the right thing everything will turn out right. thi
foreign policy and the military are not going to change. they come from the president. we know the program will continue. we know the afghanistan policy will continue. whether it's chuck hagel or someone else, a democrat running that, that's coming from the top. it matters in a political sense. i think they are promised later down the line where he thooz show resolve. we are going to defend that. in terms of the policy question, i don't think there's a lot of daylight. >> you know why? the obama foreign policy is a repudiation. pulling back in afghanistan. >> it's an extension. >> executive authority to run the war on terror. >> president's never give back authority. there was a rejection of the neoconservative of foreign policy. chuck hagel em bodies that. no to the neocons. >> true. getting back to a point you were making earlier. i have to say, i wish he would nominate his first choices. i think, for example in the case of susan rice, she had all this information and misinformation about hergs herself out there. she had to make amends for it. if you are going to slander someone, put the
a fascinating window into how foreign policy interest groups operate and has obscured the central question is hagel an ideal candidate to lead the department of defense and where is the department of defense going in the future. joining me is glenn greenwald, and we have the former senior adviser to the united nations tour on executions. spencer ackerman, the national security blog for the danger room and elise jordan who worked under condoleezza rice. i will admit, i did not realize chuck hagel was a polarizing figure until this whole thing went down. were you surprised by the reaction to hagel? >> in jewish day school we are taught that chuck hagel will come and drink our blood. so i guess it is not surprising, but the manufactured outrage of this has been just disgusting to see. you saw in a clip that you played, the audio clip, the very next thing he says discusses the contradictory and the counterproductive elements that advocates for israel often engage in, that seems they are now demonstrating right now. that hagel talks about the interest of israel. >> i think there's a strain in w
dollar. for some time now, overseas resources have been cut or withheld, and important foreign policy objectives have been starved. consider that last year we spent approximately $650 billion on our military. by contrast, the international affairs budget is less than one-tenth of the pentagon's. secretary gates has spoken about this and strongly urged the congress to address that imbalance. we have not yet. admiral mullen pointed out, the more diplomacy is cut, the more lives are lost. we have to make certain that we are not penny-wise and pound-foolish when it comes to supporting americas vital overseas interests. adequately funding foreign-policy initiatives is not spending, but investing in our long-term security, and more often or not, it saves far more expensive expenditures in dollars and lives in the conflicts that we fail to see or avoid. we need to invest in america's long-term interest in order to do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world. this report makes that crystal clear. since 1985, i have had the privilege of making official journeys to one trouble spot or another.
implications for the foreign policy and wha in what is happen the middle east, john negroponte, the first director of national intelligence appointed by george w. bush serving five times as an investor and in his distinguished career in intelligence and diplomacy. great to have you with us. >> thank you. lou: let's start with the middle east. president morsi, ordering the military to arrest civilians. what is your reaction? >> i just think it is administration of the precariousness of the situation in egypt, but that situation is critical. we can't afford to see egypt go over some kind of a brink. they are crucial to the middle east peace process. wo perhaps if egypt were to pull back from the recognition of israel, the largest arab country population in the region, therev is a critical role to play in many different ways. lou: the way his administration has engaged the muslim brotherhood, the army and egypt and what the likely result will be, are you optimistic that his diplomacy is on the correct path? >> i think it started out quite seriously, nobody knew what was going to happen when
obama's foreign policy is feckless and weak? >> i'm saying, you make your own decision. two years ago the middle east was a stable place, a government that was pro-american. they were not at war with israel. fast forward two years later, we have been very involved in toppling those dictators in the middle east but we have stepped back as those countries struggled to find new governments. they found islamist governments. we did not help them in pro democracy election. whether you talk about libya, vipt or any of the countries they were all a lot worse off than two years ago. i think the secretary of state has a lot to answer for and to explain why. what did do wrong to have the policies that have allowed the united states essentially to be blamed for most of the problems in the middle east today. >> gregg: the benghazi diplomatic mission was going to be a dangerous place. there had been previous attacks in and around it before the september 11th terror attack that killed four individuals. should we ask pretty direct questions about why you weren't protecting those people? >> yeah. what
at the peer review journal of foreign policy and the senior contributor to the. [indiscernible] which many of us, the first things we looked at in the morning. >> after? >> after. and a member of the court association of america. the clerk for the hon. warship berge john and barquette . and while a law student he was an editor from the yale law journal. i believe that is accredited. so as you can see, at two very talented. their debate is entitled to, detention policies. the way we set it up was we have -- in the book we will do it as live. steven will start and then will have great respond. >> great. thank you. it's a pleasure to be here. >> seven the fortitude to invite me to participate. i am a firm believer that the best they we can do as academics is raise the level debate. projects like this can only help in that regard with folks actually engaging with each other as opposed to talking past each other. let me offer couple of brief remarks that i lost a consistent with what i said in the book. i want to suggest that of all the myriad questions one could ask about the future of u.s. de
are making on the vigor transforming the role of the day so very unfortunate results. you talk about foreign policy as being at least two ideas or and although she's in play and i would be interested -- i keep on thinking that you are a vietnam analogy by and we must stand tough but you wouldn't subscribe to that. >> it's a special representation in the first place which dominates the rest of the book and in vietnam i think you have to take them both together. you cannot be in munich or vietnam. munich is an ethnology that tends to thrive when the country has been in peace and prosperity for long enough it feels it can do anything. it feels it can intervene on behalf of subject and oppressed people around the world and it doesn't think about the cost it hasn't had to pay the cost for several decades now. vietnam is about taking care of one's own the and paying attention to how things can go wrong despite the best of intentions. if he were a total vietnam person you will be such a realist that would be crude you wouldn't have anything on the interest and to the nation requires ideals for the
. war is obsolete. it cannot be used as a tool of our foreign policy. it's barbaric. someplace, somehow, people must come to that point and say, "i ain't gonna stay the war no more." amy goodman: have you talked to president obama about this? rep. john lewis: i have not had an opportunity. but i've spoken out on the floor of the house against the war in afghanistan, as i did against the war in iraq. amy goodman: you voted in-three days after september 11, 2001, to give president bush the authority to retaliate in a vote that was 420 to 1. you have described it was one of your toughest votes. talk about how you decided to do that. rep. john lewis: i was very disturbed about what happened on 9/11. and when i look back on it, if i had to do it all over again, i would have voted with barbara lee. it was raw courage on her part. so, because of that, i don't vote for funding for war. i vote against preparation for the military. i will never again go down that road. amy goodman: and what do you say to those who say, "then you're not supporting the military. you're not supporting the soldiers,
a half of his face because he's brilliant domestically, troubled on foreign policy. but he had a good side image so i think you could have half of him. >> can you do that? >> they can do do anything they want. >> she's the one -- >> half a face. >> so we've already talked about fdr. we've talked about truman. let's talk about reagan, a guy who when many people on the left thought he stumbled into office as an accident of history, few could expect this guy to be as transformative as he was. i would guess most historians 100 years from now will talk about the 20th century, they'll talk about fdr and reagan. >> well, there's no question. having created -- i mean, fdr creating a generation of liberal followers and reagan creating a generation of conservative followers, changing the whole idea of what we thought about government, whether one agrees or not, dealing with the cold war, being able to finally bring about that partnership with gorbachev, you know, take that wall down, the strength he showed, the communication ability, the fact that people felt optimistic during his time, the fac
rolled by opponents. the problem of chuck hagel with support in the foreign policy community is shot at from the left and the right. >> i want to put it to you, both. is this the pattern where the trial balloons are getting defeated? first we have susan rice and that was arduous. until she took her name out of contention whatsoever. and now we see chuck hagel kind of going through the same thing on the onset. >> i agree with andrea's analysis. obama now is in a bad position if he does put forth hagel's name and a fight on the hands and then ask why bother? find someone else. >> bob, is that the same assessment you would give or does the president need to say, you know what? if this is the person that i want this is the person that i've got to go for and let the chips fall where they may? >> i think a big picture is president obama wants to lower the temperature in washington and why susan rice's names is withdrawn. that would have been a fight. i don't think he's seeking needless points and vowed to change washington. that didn't happen in the first term and tired of the showdowns an
god bless you and god bless america. [applause] >> tomorrow morning a look at foreign policy in 2012. then the biggest political stories of 2012 with fox news political analyst juan williams. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors an
you wrote about in a recent piece for foreign policy magazine, that the polarization around the constitution actually reflected in your view some broader divisions within egyptian society. the next step in this competition, if you will, within the egyptian polity, is going to be parliamentary elections, which as i understand it are supposed to take place just a couple of months after the constitution is approved, assuming that it is ultimately approved. what can you tell us based on what we've seen over the last couple of months about how the competition for parliamentary elections is likely to shape up? >> sure. thanks, tammy. so, yes, in theory there is supposed to be parliamentary elections within two months. i think the big question here are liberals and non-islamists going to be brought back into the democratic process or are there still going to be elements that say the whole process is flawed, rigged, illegitimate, and they start to withdraw. and there was this debate in the lead-up to the referendum where you had parts of the opposition saying boycott because they do
announcing the first member of his new foreign policy team on friday. nominating massachusetts senator john kerry to become his next secretary of state, the move as the administration faces a host of pressing issues from the fallout over the september 11th terror attacks on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, to growing unrest in the middle east, as well as asia. our peter doocy has been following the story and live from washington. what are the details of the nominee? >> kelly, back in 2004, senator kerry let then state senator barack obama speak at his nomination, and it was a road to the white house. and yesterday at the white house president obama nominated kerry to be secretary of state in his second term. >> in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him for this role. as a son of a foreign service officer, he has a deep respect for the men and women of the the state department, the role they play in advancing our interests and values, the risks that they undertake and the sacrifice that is they make along with their families. >> issues with iran, syria and north korea are the most press
one of the foreign policy hurdles facing the president in his second term. here to break down all of those is retired army colonel and medal of honor recipient jack jacobs. is he also an msnbc military analyst and the author of basic surviving boot camp and basic training. jack, it's good to see you here, and as we talk about what we're watching in afghanistan, based on this recent news, obviously this has to be a factor in what the president and the advisors, his generals, tell him about the withdrawal. what does if mean for the contemplation of that early withdrawal from afghanistan? >> well, the irony is that as we reduce combat troops, incidents like this, that will continue in any case, then become more prominent, but no matter how many combat troops we actually withdraw from afghanistan, in the end the president is going to decide to leave a certain number of advisors there for a certain period of time and these attacks, these green on blue attacks are going to continue, and they're going to become more prominent as we withdraw american forces. fwloo what does it mean for ha
to ask him, not just about israel, but to me the most significant foreign policy challenge for president obama in our country and the world in the next year or two is iran and the nuclear weapons program. chuck hagel has had some outlying votes on that. >> i don't think he will get many republican votes. i like chuck, but his positions i didn't frankly know all of them, are really out of the mainstream and well to the left of the president. >> so on iran, hagel cast some votes not supporting iranian sanctions. on israel, these marks that he's made in the past, coming back to haunt him now. we'll have on-to-see in coming days if it becomes the fact that hagel is white house nominee. >> such an odd situation. the whole idea of nominating hagel it would be a bipartisan choice. he is a republican. former republican senator, who would be in a democratic administration. republicans are out against him. have you heard of any support for him in this process? >> well, you know there, are people who are coming out and supporting him. public letters from former, very prominent generals, admirals, a
that might influence their foreign policy and some of the military policies. >> on the upside there? >> what about china's continental border with russia. what about china buying into actuallyand actually, wa colonizing siberia? how does that worry the united states, china getting stronger on account of siberia and throw a have not heard on any proposal? >> i have not heard of any proposals of china buying into siberia. >> oh, investment. >> united states once a prosperous china that assumes greater responsibility and engagement from the world commensurate with its capabilities and economic power. we do not want china simply to grow and take a free ride or get a free ride on everything else that is happening around world. china needs to step up and take a responsible role in managing international affairs, whether it is conflict in africa, to the middle east, to north korea, and elsewhere. we're seeing some of that already. there's good cooperation on many issues, including afghanistan, engagement with china on issues of north korea. we may not always agree, and certainly china has cut back
policy organizations. the website of the council on foreign relations targeted in a sophisticated attack. chinese hackers are suspected of using a new ploy called a drive-by. apparently getting into the server that operates the website and using the system to attack cfr members and others who visited the site. doug luzader is keeping an eye on that from washington. this is a website, doug, visited by a lot of powerful people. >> reporter: jon, good morning that may have been the motivation behind this attack. according to the washington beacon, computer specialists think that chinese hackers may have been behind this if you go to the website itself, everything works just fine. that is apparently the nature of this kind of attack where hackers are just out to glean information. the council did send fox news a statement about the situation saying that the council on foreign relations website security team is aware of the issue and is currently investigating the situation. we're also working to mitigate the possibility for future events of this sort. now, again according to the free beacon
in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years. as we turn the page on a decade of war, he understands that we've got to harness all elements of american power and ensure that they're working together diplomatic and development, economic and political, military and intelligence, as well as the power of our values which inspire so many people around the world. as john has said, we are an exceptional nation not because we say we are, because we do exceptional things. and i'd say that one of the more exceptional things we've seen in recent decades was when john helped lead the way, along with folks like john mccain and others, to restore our diplomatic ties with vietnam. when he returned to the country where he and so many others had fought so long ago, it sent a powerful message of progress and of healing. over these many years, john's earned the respect and confidence of leaders around the world. he is not going to need a lot of on-the-job training. he has earned the respect and trust of his senate colleagues, democrats and republicans. i think it's fair to say that few ind
the most significant foreign policy challenge for president obama and our world is iran. nuclear weapons program. chuck hagel has had some very outlying votes on that. >> i don't think he's going to get many republican votes. i like chuck, but his positions, i really didn't know all of them, frankly well out of the main street and to left of the president. >> he is the subject of a new ad opposing his nomination as defense secretary. dana, what do you think? he might not sail through like john kerry. is he going to get the votes you think? >> i think the question is whether or not he is even going to get the nomination given the comments he made. the senate is a club, and they like to give props to the club. senator haggle was not one of the most popular members of the club and that's coming out right now. >> and john kerry was and is as you well known. dana, coming up, a devastating story to tell you about. more than 100 people killed when a bakery is bombed in syria. the latest on the devastation and why the government is firing on its own people. next. this holiday, share everything.
the president has advocated in this foreign policy? >> yes. >> is that the root cause? >> i think the root cause is not being adequately or not adequately understanding the nature of the evil threat of the the -- the evil of the threat and taking leadership steps and making sure our embassy security and the personnel with whom we are allied with are protected. the people deployed abroad are unbelievably good people who do for us the american people an important service. they need to be protected and regrettably there was a break, a systemic failure. >> 10 seconds or less. she has said that she will testify in mid-january. do you have any reason to doubt that? >> i don't know. the fact that she wasn't here has not testified during these several monthsment we -- several months. to have the secretary of state come up and give an accounting right after this occurred to tell us exactly who knew what and when and the chain of command. was she aware of the incredible risks that went unheeded. >> congressman chris smith. thank you very much. >> the muss 4reu78 brotherhood is claiming a second round on a
significant foreign policy challenge for president obama and our country and the world in the next year or two is iran and its nuclear weapons program. chuck hagel has had some very outlying votes on that. >> i don't think he's going to get republican votes. i like chuck, but his positions, i didn't really quite frankly nomo all know all of them. >> senator lindsey graham, very prominent senator, already some of hagel's own republican party coming up against him. >> we'll see if this campaign against him is effective enough, i guess, barbara, in order for this nomination not to happen at all. this is the big open question with regards to chuck hagel. barbara, we'll keep in touch on this story throughout the coming hours. barbara starr at the pentagon. >>> it is the bottom of the hour. i'm hala gorani in washington, d.c. in for brooke baldwin today. this year definitely had its share of crime stories. some capturing international attention and outrage. others were filled with disturbing details almost too hard to believe. here is randi kaye with the top ten crime and punishment stories of 2012.
to breathe. i'm joined by a washington-based journalist who specializes in foreign policy. she attended a university in new delhi and has personally experienced what i understand is groping on public transportation. tell us, first of all, what is the -- what is going on? what is happening there that you've got even over the last, you know, years or so more than a tenfold increase in the past 40 years in india of this kind of violence against women. >> it's always been the case. it's not new as such. to be a woman in india is not an easy proposition. every woman has experienced some kind of abuse on public transportation, lewd remarks on the streets if you're walking down. no matter how conservatively you're dressed, you're still, you know, open season for the men. there is just a lot of reasons why this happens. patriarchal system is one, a lack of policing is another, and general treatment of women, which is not equal to men, even though it may be so under the law. >> you say you personally have experienced this as well. can you tell us about that. >> yes. i was a student at new delhi
with the united states government and that is, i'll support you are foreign policy initiatives in the region by and large if you stay out of my internal affairs. i think that's where he is right now. it appears like the united states government is doing just that. heather: take this beyond the borders of egypt to the area of the middle east, what does this mean for the rest of the ream on? >> well, it is pretty significant. egypt is the a very influential country. even though it is one of the poorest countries in the region, it is a powerful arab country. it has a powerful military for sure and has significant intellectual and cultural influence on the region. so what goes on in egypt truly matters. listen, the contours of this revolutionary change taking place in the middle east, certainly the catalyst for it was democratic and social reform and economic opportunity but the radicals, the muslim brotherhood, are easy seeing the opportunity to advantage themselves geopolitically in the region. that is the danger here. that this continues to move in that direction in other parts of the region.
it means to our own foreign policy. we asked the question yesterday if syria is blowing up and there's defections i will ask ambassador john bolt upon coming up why is it our responsibility? kelly, the u.s. always has to get involved but with tens of thousands people there being killed already maybe it is time. kelly: the ambassador will shed some light on that. i'm looking forward to the conversation as well. definitely something we'll be discussing. meantime, jamie, there are new weather warnings and out there and details on weather delays. we're tracking a massiveo# storm moving across theo# country this busy day aftero# christmas. jamie: a deadly tanker trucko# explosion shuts down a majoro# highway in one of america'so# busiest cities.o# if it is not hard enough to get around how about trying to maneuver around this? we'll tell you what happened. kelly: new details on the deadly ambush that killed two firefighters in webster new york. >> we're being shot at. i am shot. assault rifles. we have multiple firemen down. working fire. [ cellphone chirping ] [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive
country as great as it is. that foreign policy record we have is something to be proud of. that is not to say we should be putting boots on the ground or putting our men and women in harm's way but i think we do have an opportunity, or at least, you know, a chance to start to comprise some policies that could help steer syria out of this and also we obviously need to be worrying about iran, its nuclear program and its meddling in the politics and policies of some of our allies in the region. jamie: i'm not exaggerating, but sometimes i lock my door at night i think about iran. it is so scary. if people don't follow it they should. we're a little stretched now in the united states. we have boots on the ground and we have a lot of other things. it is very difficult to get intel on iran. they are surely fueling syria and all the violence that's going on there. even russia has been a bit hands off. what could we do? >> well, you know, first of all, iran's fingerprints are all over syria. i think that is undeniable. they continue to help the syrians crack down on this insurrect
on foreign relations, author of "foreign policy begins at home: the case for putting america's house in order." and in washington, vice president and executive editor of msnbc.com and msnbc political analyst, richard wolffe. a minor round of applause for richard wolffe. >> one hand clapping. >> first of all, can anybody here come up with a synonym -- i don't care what it is -- so we don't have to employ the phrase "fiscal cliff" at all during the day? any ideas? anybody got any -- >> how about deadline? >> how about do your job. how about just do your job time. it is ridiculous. a little news, then we'll chatter about this. as if tax hikes and spending cuts weren't enough, there's a new reminder that the nation's debt ceiling is also hanging over the budget talks in washington. in a letter to congress yesterday, treasury secretary timothy geithner warned the government would hit its legal borrow i borrowing limit i limit by monday. geithner says the treasury will be forced to take, quote, extraordinary measures to keep paying the bills. he also referenced the impending fiscal cliff, which thr
the right pick? does that make him a defense expert? >> no. he is not a defense expert dave. foreign policy expert. what we need in a very complex world today ratcheted by wars in afghanistan. cyber war. threats from iran, north korea, china, et cetera. and a defense department has more than 3 million people scattered across this world. it's someone that really understands defense. someone that's spent their entire life working the bureaucracy that knows the industrial base that knows soldiers. you know, i have nothing against senator hagel. he is a fine man. i have met him before. i think he is well-intended. but what we need are people like michelle floornoid. ash hammer. we need people who know the systems inside-out. the president needs the best advice in a time of war and time of crisis. we are forcing says questions station. tenuous time for armed forces given all these threats. >> dave: after what john boehner said on friday it looks like sequestration could actually happen. the question is why does the president want chuck hagel. when you look at his background. maybe not a defense
public relations to become the policy chief. cabinet ministers are falling into place. he selected longtime ally fumio kishida as foreign minister. he served as minister in charge of okinawa and the northern territories. analysts say that he chose him for his experience. the new foreign minister will have to deal with the relocation of the futenma air station in okinawa. abe is pressuring the bank of japan again to swiftly join his government and put an end to deflation. he says it's only natural for the government to get involved in shaping monetary policy noting that conventional steps have failed to pull japan out of the drawn-out price downturn. abe made his call with officials of the japan business federation or keidanren on tuesday. >> translator: soon after we form a new cabinet tomorrow, i hope the government can establish a policy accord with the bank of japan to set an inflation target of 2%. the bank should be held accountable to meeting the target. >> last week boj policymakers decided to decide whether to set the 2% target in january. the bank's current goal is 1%. mea
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